Monday, August 9, 2010

Little King's Story Classes

I have been meaning to write about Little King's Story for quite some time now. It is a very fun and distinctive game that resembles Pikmin in much of its gameplay. Essentially, you play the game by calling various citizens to follow your character, the titular Little King, and them ordering them to complete various tasks. As such, much of the gameplay is built around choosing the right balance of occupations among your followers so you have all of the skills you need in order to defeat the enemies before you and clear the obstacles out of your path towards world domination. Unfortunately, one of my major pet peeves of them game relates to how the various occupations were designed. While a few of them are very functional and well designed, there are also quite a few that could be significantly improved.

Probably the best designed classes in the game are the Hardworking Farmers, the Buff Lumberjacks, and the Ripped Miners. Other than the combat classes, these are the three classes that I found myself bringing multiples of on a regular basis. These three classes form the backbone of the exploration, treasure-finding, and problem-solving in the game: farmers dig holes to find stuff, lumberjacks clear out logs blocking the path, and miners eliminate rocks that are in the way. While almost any class can perform these tasks, these three classes do the same job in a third of the time. Furthermore, only they can start work on particularly difficult projects such as massive boulders. So, unlocking these classes serves as a way to open up new areas of the game-world. Furthermore, the Miners in particular can instant-kill a certain rock enemy. I actually wish the farmers and lumberjacks also has associated enemies they could instant-kill; I am fond of that kind of "use the right weapon to defeat the enemy" design. These classes are even useful in fighting certain bosses. Since they mix basic utility with knowing when to bring extras for particular challenges, I really like these three classes.

On the other hand, we have the soldier classes. They are actually very similar to the aforementioned farmers, lumberjacks, and miners, in that they can do a wide range of jobs but specialize at one in particular: combat, in this case. However, I have two general problems with the soldier classes. The first problem is that throwing soldiers at the enemy is just about the only form of combat in the game. The main strategy of combat is waiting for the enemy to become vulnerable, send in the soldiers, then call back the soldiers before the enemy attacks. Having a few more types of combat class with different strengths, weaknesses, and special abilities might have made it a little more interesting. My second problem is that eventually your Grunt Soldiers are obsoleted when you acquire Hardened Veterans, which do everything Grunt Soldiers do, except they have two special abilities as well. Having one class that is a direct upgrade of another is really frustrating. I ended up with a couple dozen Grunt Soldiers I was no longer using spending their days wandering around my kingdom (there was no advantage to spend the cash to upgrade them compared to making new guys into my main army).

On that note, the fact that the carpenters get replaced twice is even more galling. Carpenters as a class are much more limited in scope than soldiers or the workers. All they do is build bridges and staircases at certain points in the game. If I didn't expect to find a build-point, I usually didn't bother to bring one at all. Since the later varieties of carpenter get the ability to build structures the earlier ones cannot, the carpenters mainly serve as a means to make sure the player has built up his kingdom to specific levels by certain points in the game. As the lumberjacks and miners prove, there are much more elegant ways of doing this. To add insult to injury, the third tier Giga carpenters are only required once in the entire game.

Next up are the Animal Hunters, the only real non-soldier combat class in the game. These guys are actually interesting. They do spice up combat a little, and have the special ability to shoot down certain kinds of projectiles the enemy sometimes throws at you. They can also take on flying or elevated opponents that the soldiers can't get at. However, their use is rather niche. If you aren't going to be taking on flying enemies or such, there is little reason to bring them over soldiers. I also find the fact that they can only carry a limited supply of arrows to be a little unnecessary.

Next up are the extreme specialists: the Gourmet Chef and the Savvy Merchant. Gourmet Chefs can only do one thing: instant kill giant chicken enemies. It is actually an interesting niche. Giant chickens are typically rather obnoxious enemies, but a single chef can wipe out an entire army of them by himself. You don't always need to bring them, but they are very valuable in specific situations. Similarly there are the Savvy Merchants, who have the ability to find hidden buried treasure and unlock a certain kind of treasure. Other than making you some money, Savvy merchants are completely optional. Honestly, there is nothing particularly wrong with these specialists, but I kind of wish they had some other use to justify creating more than one or two of either. This is where giving citizens a use other than following the player around would have been nice. Maybe making more merchants could have opened up some shops for the player to buy from?

Similar to the two trainable specialists are the immigrants, four specialists who move to your kingdom from defeated kingdoms. You only ever get one of each type. I actually really like these guys. While each one of them is only capable of removing a specific kind of unusual obstacle, they do give you give you access to nice treasures and new areas while adding a lot to the flavor of the game. Since you get them automatically without spending money, there is little reason to complain about them being so specialized. I am honestly disappointed there weren't immigrants corresponding to the rest of the rival kingdoms in the game.

Finally, there are the three secret classes found at the end of the game: the Steel Knight, the Rainbow Wizard, and the Doctor. All three of these classes can only be acquired towards the very end of the game after spending a lot of money on various investments, and you can only ever have one of each. To be honest, I really don't like these guys. It feels a little frustrating that I couldn't train citizens of my own choosing to be a Doctor or Wizard. Furthermore, by the time you actually get these characters, you are already pretty much at the end of the game, rendering them rather useless. I think I would have preferred some mid to late game units that could have been deployed in numbers enough to actually mix up combat.

Overall, the game played quite well, but I think there is still a fair bit of room for improvement. Giving classes stuff to do in the kingdom would have been interesting, and more options to make combat more interesting would have been nice. I would really like to see a sequel to Little King's Story someday, or at least someone make another game in the same vein.

1 comment:

Pseudo said...

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